Subjects we covered

Corporate Law

A legal professional in India can specialize in any specific area of Indian law, such as labor, tax, constitutional, corporate and family law, to name a few. Corporate law mainly regulates the formation and operations of business organizations, companies, corporate houses and other business practices.
The provisions of corporate law establish that a company has a separate legal identity. A company has its own legal rights and legal obligations that are independent of its members. You can file a lawsuit against a company. However, it is not mandatory that the dispute be extended to its owner and shareholders.

 

Corporate law: a good professional option
A lawyer specializing in corporate law helps corporate houses with legal processes and resolution of corporate disputes. In addition, it helps them to assert their legal rights and to know their legal responsibilities. The industrial boom in India has made corporate law a lucrative career option.

In case you plan to specialize in corporate law, there are several employment opportunities to consider, such as joining a corporate law firm. However, before joining a legal firm, it is essential to confirm their level of experience, reputation in the market, location and size.
Another option you choose is to start an independent legal practice. Small business owners prefer to hire an independent corporate lawyer instead of hiring expensive services from large corporate law firms. In addition, you can start your practice by working with an experienced corporate lawyer.
You may also consider joining the legal department of a corporate organization. Several leading corporate organizations hire corporate lawyers for their own legal departments. These firms have their own legal departments to carry out their legal procedures and legal procedures.
However, to pursue a successful career as a corporate lawyer; You should know the company’s laws, trademark laws, copyright laws, tax and securities laws, and government regulations and regulations

Hindu Law

India, being a secular country, approves a system of personal laws of India with separate laws for different religions; This includes Hindu law, Muslim law, Christian law and Parsee law. Hindu laws mainly deal with matters related to marriage, divorce, adoption, guardianship and inheritance.
Hindu laws apply to people who are Hindu by religion, and include members of the Hindu, Sikh, Jain and Buddhist communities. They are also applicable to an individual who is not Christian, Muslim, Jewish or parsi and also to those who are not regulated by any other personal law.

Modern Hindu Law: Key Components

Modern Hindu law comprises the following components:

The Law of Guardianship and Hindu Minority (1956)
The Hindu minority and guardianship Act of 1956 regulates the guardianship relationship between an adult and a minor. It also addresses issues related to the child’s property. The Law was intended to improve the provisions of the Guardians and Guards Act of 1890. However, it cannot be considered as the replacement of the Guardians and Guards Act of 1890.
According to the Guardianship and Hindu Minority Law, a minor is a person under 18. A guardian is a person who takes care of the child and his property. Certain categories of tutors include:

A natural guardian

A guardian appointed by the mother or father of the minor.

A guardian appointed to the minor by the Court.

A person who qualifies as a guardian according to the Court of the Chambers.

The Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act (1956)

Although a derivative of the Hindu law enshrined in ‘Manu Smriti’, the Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act of 1956 adopts a different approach on this subject. A legal adoption process is stipulated for Hindus, Sikhs, Jains and Buddhists. Such an adult must meet certain conditions in order to adopt a child under the Law:

Must be able enough to keep the adopted child.

The child must fall into the Hindu category and be able to be adopted.

The adoption is considered legally valid only if it is carried out in accordance with the provisions of the Law.

The Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act of 1956 also provides that maintenance be given to family members, such as children, wife, parents and parents-in-law.

The Code of Criminal Procedure

The Code of Criminal Procedure commonly called the Code of Criminal Procedure (CrPC) is the main legislation on the procedure for the administration of substantive criminal law in India. It was promulgated in 1973 and entered into force on April 1, 1974. Provides the mechanism for the investigation of the crime, the detention of suspected criminals, the collection of evidence, the determination of guilt or the innocence of the accused person and the determination of the punishment of the guilty party. It also deals with public nuisance, crime prevention and the maintenance of the wife, child and parents.

 

Currently, the law contains 484 sections, 2 schedules and 56 forms. The sections are divided into 37 chapters.
In medieval India, after the law established by Muslims, Mohammedan criminal law prevailed. The British rulers passed the Regulatory Law of 1773 under which a Supreme Court was established in Calcutta and later in Madras and Bombay. The Supreme Court had to apply the British procedural law when deciding the cases of the subjects of the Crown.

 

After the rebellion of 1857, the crown took over the administration in India. The Criminal Procedure Code of 1861 was approved by the British parliament. The CRPC was first created in 1882 and then amended in 1898, then, according to the 41st report of the law commission in 1973.

The Code of Criminal Procedure

The Code of Criminal Procedure commonly called the Code of Criminal Procedure (CrPC) is the main legislation on the procedure for the administration of substantive criminal law in India. It was promulgated in 1973 and entered into force on April 1, 1974. Provides the mechanism for the investigation of the crime, the detention of suspected criminals, the collection of evidence, the determination of guilt or the innocence of the accused person and the determination of the punishment of the guilty party. It also deals with public nuisance, crime prevention and the maintenance of the wife, child and parents.

 

Currently, the law contains 484 sections, 2 schedules and 56 forms. The sections are divided into 37 chapters.
In medieval India, after the law established by Muslims, Mohammedan criminal law prevailed. The British rulers passed the Regulatory Law of 1773 under which a Supreme Court was established in Calcutta and later in Madras and Bombay. The Supreme Court had to apply the British procedural law when deciding the cases of the subjects of the Crown.

 

After the rebellion of 1857, the crown took over the administration in India. The Criminal Procedure Code of 1861 was approved by the British parliament. The CRPC was first created in 1882 and then amended in 1898, then, according to the 41st report of the law commission in 1973.

The Civil Procedure Code

The Civil Procedure Code of 1908 is a procedural law related to the administration of civil procedures in India.
The Code is divided into two parts: the first part contains 158 sections and the second part contains the First List, which has 51 Orders and Rules. The sections provide provisions related to general principles of jurisdiction, while Orders and Rules prescribe procedures and methods that govern civil procedures in India.

To give uniformity to the Civil Procedure, the Legislative Council of India promulgated the Civil Procedure Code of 1858, which received the consent of the Governor General on March 23, 1859. However, the Code was not applicable to the Supreme Court of Justice in the Cities of the Presidency and the courts of the presidency of small cause. It did not meet the challenges and was replaced by the Code of Civil Procedure, 1877. But it still did not meet the time requirements and large amendments were introduced. In 1882, the Civil Procedure Code of 1882 was introduced. Over time, it is considered that it needed flexibility for punctuality and effectiveness. To solve these problems, the Civil Procedure Code of 1908 was promulgated. Although it has been modified several times, it has stood the test of time

Constitution of India

The Constitution of India establishes the supreme legal framework that governs India. It establishes the basic political principles and the fundamental structure, procedure, powers and duties of the government of India. It also grants fundamental rights and imposes some fundamental duties on all Indian citizens. In addition, it establishes the Guiding Principles of State Policy. The Guiding Principles are a set of guidelines for central and state governments. They must comply with these guidelines before formulating new laws and policies.
The Constitution of India establishes India as a secular, democratic and sovereign nation. In addition, it guarantees equality, freedom and justice to all Indian citizens. It also promotes unity, integrity, secularism, socialism and democracy.

Highlights of Constitution of India

Here are some highlights of the Constitution of India:

Preamble

The Preamble of Constitution of India comprise of the following:

  • Equality: Equal opportunity and social status for all Indian citizens.
  • Justice: Social, political and economic justice.
  • Fraternity: This guarantees individual’s dignity and country’s unity.
  • Liberty: Liberty to all Indian citizens for freedom of expression, religion, speech, and beliefs.

Fundamental Rights

The Constitution of India grants seven fundamental rights to Indian citizens, to promote democracy in the country, such as:

 

  • Right to Education.
  • Right to Equality.
  • Right to Freedom from Exploitation.
  • Right to Freedom of Religion.
  • Right to Particular Freedom.
  • Cultural and Educational Rights.
  • Right to Constitutional Remedies.

Fundamental Duties

The Indian Constitution also imposes some fundamental duties along with the grant of fundamental rights. These duties are moral obligations imposed to encourage spirit of unity and national integrity.

Directive Principles

The Directive Principles of State Policy are included in part IV of Indian Constitution, play an important role in governance of the country. The government of India complies with these principles while framing legislations. The Directive Principles of Indian Constitution are based on the Directive Principles of Constitution of Ireland and relate to economic progress, social justice, foreign policy, administrative and legal matters.

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